Sunday, October 28, 2007

12YR OLDS TO RECEIVE CERVICAL CANCER VACCINE

The government has announced that from next year all 12 year old girls will receive vaccinations to prevent them developing cervical cancer in later life. The vaccine aims to kill the human papilloma virus, one of the main causes of the disease. Critics argue that the vaccine will encourage under-age sex in young girls. However health professionals and Cancer UK welcomed the new measures as a revolutionary new way of beating cervical cancer. The Health Minister Ann Keen stressed that the jabs were about preventing cancer not to encourage promiscuous behaviour in youngsters. A Department of Health professor said the new initiative would help “generations of women for years to come”. Over 2,000 women are diagnosed with cervical cancer every year in Britain. The vaccination programme is due to begin next September and will save hundreds of lives a year. Good news for everyone.

4 comments:

Sheila said...

I think this is a good idea and don't see how it will encourage under-age sex since it is not a birth control measure.

Naomi said...

I think it's a great idea too Sheila and a great cancer preventative.

Kyle & Svet Keeton said...

I don't think that this vaccine could encourage girls for early sex. Mass media, TV shows could!.. How to prevent it - just give them another goals in life, something interesting and serious... I have to nieces in England - they are there since 5 years old and speak English much batter than Russian. They both are in Cambridge now, when they were in school they went to some Bible Club, where they had a lot of interesting and useful activities. They still sure that people suppose to have first sex experience after getting marriage and I don't argue with it ;).

Svetlana
PS I think this vaccine is very good idea!

Naomi said...

I agree Svet, I think some tv shows do encourage underage sex. Having outside interests is important to youngsters. The vaccine is a great idea, especially if it prevents a lot of unnecssary cancer cases.